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The latest Post Viral Fatigue / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / ME / CFS news

ME woman Beth French swims 26 miles to Scilly

A woman who was once forced to use a wheelchair because of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), or ME, has swum 26 miles from Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. Beth French, 36, who had the condition as a teenager, made the crossing in 17 hours, 28 minutes. The massage therapist from Milverton, Somerset, is believed to be the first person to complete the swim in that direction. Now she is planning a swim from Gibraltar to Morocco. Beth French said she was stung all over her body by jellyfish Ms French was struck with glandular fever at the age
Thu 24 Jul 2014

ME woman Beth French swims 26 miles to Scilly

A woman who was once forced to use a wheelchair because of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), or ME, has swum 26 miles from Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. Beth French, 36, who had the condition as a teenager, made the crossing in 17 hours, 28 minutes. The massage therapist from Milverton, Somerset, is believed to be the first person to complete the swim in that direction. Now she is planning a swim from Gibraltar to Morocco. Beth French said she was stung all over her body by jellyfish Ms French was struck with glandular fever at the age
Thu 24 Jul 2014

ME woman Beth French swims 26 miles to Scilly

A woman who was once forced to use a wheelchair because of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), or ME, has swum 26 miles from Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. Beth French, 36, who had the condition as a teenager, made the crossing in 17 hours, 28 minutes. The massage therapist from Milverton, Somerset, is believed to be the first person to complete the swim in that direction. Now she is planning a swim from Gibraltar to Morocco. Beth French said she was stung all over her body by jellyfish Ms French was struck with glandular fever at the age
Thu 24 Jul 2014

A life-saving hepatitis C cure with an $84,000 price tag

Hepatitis C is one of the deadliest virus infections in the world, affecting more than 150 million people. The good news is a recently developed cure . There's a catch, however. In the US, patients will be required to pay $84,000 (£49,000) for a 12-week treatment, which may limit the cure to only those who can afford it. Without treatment, hepatitis C can induce chronic fatigue and fever, and eventually lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer or even death. In the past, a patient with advanced hepatitis C would have had to endure long-term treatments with intense side effects. In some
Wed 23 Jul 2014

A life-saving hepatitis C cure with an $84,000 price tag

Hepatitis C is one of the deadliest virus infections in the world, affecting more than 150 million people. The good news is a recently developed cure . There's a catch, however. In the US, patients will be required to pay $84,000 (£49,000) for a 12-week treatment, which may limit the cure to only those who can afford it. Without treatment, hepatitis C can induce chronic fatigue and fever, and eventually lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer or even death. In the past, a patient with advanced hepatitis C would have had to endure long-term treatments with intense side effects. In some
Wed 23 Jul 2014

A life-saving hepatitis C cure with an $84,000 price tag

Hepatitis C is one of the deadliest virus infections in the world, affecting more than 150 million people. The good news is a recently developed cure . There's a catch, however. In the US, patients will be required to pay $84,000 (£49,000) for a 12-week treatment, which may limit the cure to only those who can afford it. Without treatment, hepatitis C can induce chronic fatigue and fever, and eventually lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer or even death. In the past, a patient with advanced hepatitis C would have had to endure long-term treatments with intense side effects. In some
Wed 23 Jul 2014

Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes's daughter Frieda: Why I'm becoming a counsellor

The painter and poet Frieda Hughes, 54, daughter of Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, has decided to train as a bereavement counsellor following a series of losses - her mother killing herself, her father dying of cancer, and later, her brother Nicholas also taking his own life. How do people cope with tragedy? Frieda Hughes lives in rural Wales, where she rescues birds - crows, magpies and birds of prey. In her poem The Trouble With Death, she describes how her distress at burying a dead crow suddenly brings back all the other losses in her life - the deaths
Tue 13 May 2014

Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes's daughter Frieda: Why I'm becoming a counsellor

The painter and poet Frieda Hughes, 54, daughter of Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, has decided to train as a bereavement counsellor following a series of losses - her mother killing herself, her father dying of cancer, and later, her brother Nicholas also taking his own life. How do people cope with tragedy? Frieda Hughes lives in rural Wales, where she rescues birds - crows, magpies and birds of prey. In her poem The Trouble With Death, she describes how her distress at burying a dead crow suddenly brings back all the other losses in her life - the deaths
Tue 13 May 2014

Why big buttocks can be bad for your health

The demand for bigger buttocks in Venezuela means some women will even have banned injections to achieve them, putting their health at risk. It is with tears in her eyes that Denny recounts how she woke up one day to find a bump the size of a football in her lower back. She could not walk or bend down, and the pain was intense. Even before she saw a doctor, Denny, a 35-year-old Venezuelan lawyer, knew the bump must be a side-effect of liquid silicone that had been injected in her buttocks. It had moved into her back and was
Sun 20 Apr 2014

Why big buttocks can be bad for your health

The demand for bigger buttocks in Venezuela means some women will even have banned injections to achieve them, putting their health at risk. It is with tears in her eyes that Denny recounts how she woke up one day to find a bump the size of a football in her lower back. She could not walk or bend down, and the pain was intense. Even before she saw a doctor, Denny, a 35-year-old Venezuelan lawyer, knew the bump must be a side-effect of liquid silicone that had been injected in her buttocks. It had moved into her back and was
Sun 20 Apr 2014

Why big buttocks can be bad for your health

The demand for bigger buttocks in Venezuela means some women will even have banned injections to achieve them, putting their health at risk. It is with tears in her eyes that Denny recounts how she woke up one day to find a bump the size of a football in her lower back. She could not walk or bend down, and the pain was intense. Even before she saw a doctor, Denny, a 35-year-old Venezuelan lawyer, knew the bump must be a side-effect of liquid silicone that had been injected in her buttocks. It had moved into her back and was
Sun 20 Apr 2014

The rise of the 'extreme commuter'

Most people hate commuting, a modern-day necessary evil. So why would anyone choose to build a lengthy commute into their lifestyle, asks Karen Gregor. Marcus used to live in London, but moved to rural Suffolk to give his children a bucolic upbringing. In doing so, he created a commute of - on a good day - two hours and 45 minutes in one direction. On a bad day (snow on the line, the wrong kind of leaves) it can take him anything up to three and half hours from home to office. The journey starts off by car - a
Fri 27 Dec 2013

The rise of the 'extreme commuter'

Most people hate commuting, a modern-day necessary evil. So why would anyone choose to build a lengthy commute into their lifestyle, asks Karen Gregor. Marcus used to live in London, but moved to rural Suffolk to give his children a bucolic upbringing. In doing so, he created a commute of - on a good day - two hours and 45 minutes in one direction. On a bad day (snow on the line, the wrong kind of leaves) it can take him anything up to three and half hours from home to office. The journey starts off by car - a
Fri 27 Dec 2013

The rise of the 'extreme commuter'

Most people hate commuting, a modern-day necessary evil. So why would anyone choose to build a lengthy commute into their lifestyle, asks Karen Gregor. Marcus used to live in London, but moved to rural Suffolk to give his children a bucolic upbringing. In doing so, he created a commute of - on a good day - two hours and 45 minutes in one direction. On a bad day (snow on the line, the wrong kind of leaves) it can take him anything up to three and half hours from home to office. The journey starts off by car - a
Fri 27 Dec 2013

Guernsey Albert Pier crash driver Ian Wainwright banned

The Guernsey driver who injured a man and a two-year-old boy in a crash has been fined and banned from driving. Ian Wainwright, 63, of Grandes Rocques Road in the Castel, pleaded guilty to driving without due care and attention at the Albert Pier, in July. At Guernsey Magistrates' Court, he was fined £1,000 and banned from driving for nine months. Mark Campbell, 30, had to have his leg amputated because of injuries he suffered in the collision. Two-year-old Aiden Mroch suffered internal injuries to his right leg and both were flown to UK hospitals for treatment. 'Sense of
Thu 12 Dec 2013

Guernsey Albert Pier crash driver Ian Wainwright banned

The Guernsey driver who injured a man and a two-year-old boy in a crash has been fined and banned from driving. Ian Wainwright, 63, of Grandes Rocques Road in the Castel, pleaded guilty to driving without due care and attention at the Albert Pier, in July. At Guernsey Magistrates' Court, he was fined £1,000 and banned from driving for nine months. Mark Campbell, 30, had to have his leg amputated because of injuries he suffered in the collision. Two-year-old Aiden Mroch suffered internal injuries to his right leg and both were flown to UK hospitals for treatment. 'Sense of
Thu 12 Dec 2013

Sutton hospital services to move to Epsom and St Helier

Plans to move most services from the smallest hospital in a south London trust have been approved by the Epsom and St Helier NHS Trust. Under the plan about 60% of services at Sutton Hospital will move to St Helier in London and about 20% to Epsom Hospital in Surrey. The Sutton Clinical Commissioning Group has also approved the move. Services will be moved from Sutton Hospital between February and August, the trust said. Jackie Sullivan, the chief operating officer at the trust, said: "It will allow us to maintain the full range of clinical services we currently provide, invest
Sat 7 Dec 2013

Sutton hospital services to move to Epsom and St Helier

Plans to move most services from the smallest hospital in a south London trust have been approved by the Epsom and St Helier NHS Trust. Under the plan about 60% of services at Sutton Hospital will move to St Helier in London and about 20% to Epsom Hospital in Surrey. The Sutton Clinical Commissioning Group has also approved the move. Services will be moved from Sutton Hospital between February and August, the trust said. Jackie Sullivan, the chief operating officer at the trust, said: "It will allow us to maintain the full range of clinical services we currently provide, invest
Sat 7 Dec 2013

Sutton hospital services to move to Epsom and St Helier

Plans to move most services from the smallest hospital in a south London trust have been approved by the Epsom and St Helier NHS Trust. Under the plan about 60% of services at Sutton Hospital will move to St Helier in London and about 20% to Epsom Hospital in Surrey. The Sutton Clinical Commissioning Group has also approved the move. Services will be moved from Sutton Hospital between February and August, the trust said. Jackie Sullivan, the chief operating officer at the trust, said: "It will allow us to maintain the full range of clinical services we currently provide, invest
Sat 7 Dec 2013

Child cancer lies: Cwmcarn teacher Kelly Baker banned

A disciplinary hearing in Cardiff was told she even phoned the school on one occasion to say she could not work because the child had lost the use of their legs and fallen into a coma. She produced fake medical certificates on her home computer in a bid to back up her story. But her lies were exposed when her head teacher tried to visit the child in hospital to deliver a card. Education officials suspended her from her £30,000-a-year job after becoming suspicious. The General Teaching Council for Wales (GTCW) has banned her from teaching after finding her guilty
Wed 28 Aug 2013

PVF Science - How does the body fight off a virus?

White blood cells called macrophages destroy germs as soon as they detect them. However, if a viral infection begins to take hold we fight back using a more powerful defence of white cells called T and B lymphocytes. Antibodies are a special protein made by B cells. They bind to a virus to stop it from replicating, and also tag viruses so that other blood cells know to destroy them. T cells have different roles to play. Some act as guard dogs that raise the alarm when they detect invading viruses; others kill virus-infected cells directly, or help B cells
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Study shows ME/CFS 'virus link' found in children

A study on children has found further evidence that ME, or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, could be caused by a virus. Scientists at the University of Dundee study found abnormalities in the white blood cells of children with ME/CFS, suggesting they had been fighting off infection. ME (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis), also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), causes debilitating tiredness. About 150,000 people in the UK have ME/CFS, 15,000 of whom are children. The condition is characterised by physical and mental exhaustion following normal activities. Symptoms can include muscle pain, sore throat, tender lymph nodes, multi-joint pain and headaches. In the study,
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Dorset woman with severe ME 'left to rot by the NHS'

A Dorset woman with severe ME who has been unable to leave her bed for eight years has been "left to rot" by the NHS, her family has said. Libby Meyers, 62, is in a nursing home in Charlton Down near Dorchester but her family want her to be treated at a specialist NHS centre in Essex. Her husband and daughter have appealed three times but their applications have been rejected by NHS Dorset. The trust said it was working with the family to address their concerns. ME, which stands for myalgic encephalomyelitis, is also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: 'Surrounded by uncertainty'

When it comes to controversy and heated debate, few illnesses come close to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, also known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME). There have been arguments about whether it exists, the cause, the best treatments and even the name itself. These disagreements have reached the level of . The disease itself, however, remains poorly understood - or as one doctor put it: "The whole thing is surrounded by uncertainty". Does it exist? For a long time, the existence of CFS/ME was widely dismissed and labelled as "yuppie flu". That opinion has largely been reversed in the past decade. Should
Wed 28 Aug 2013

PVF Science - How does the body fight off a virus?

White blood cells called macrophages destroy germs as soon as they detect them. However, if a viral infection begins to take hold we fight back using a more powerful defence of white cells called T and B lymphocytes. Antibodies are a special protein made by B cells. They bind to a virus to stop it from replicating, and also tag viruses so that other blood cells know to destroy them. T cells have different roles to play. Some act as guard dogs that raise the alarm when they detect invading viruses; others kill virus-infected cells directly, or help B cells
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Study shows ME/CFS 'virus link' found in children

A study on children has found further evidence that ME, or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, could be caused by a virus. Scientists at the University of Dundee study found abnormalities in the white blood cells of children with ME/CFS, suggesting they had been fighting off infection. ME (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis), also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), causes debilitating tiredness. About 150,000 people in the UK have ME/CFS, 15,000 of whom are children. The condition is characterised by physical and mental exhaustion following normal activities. Symptoms can include muscle pain, sore throat, tender lymph nodes, multi-joint pain and headaches. In the study,
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Dorset woman with severe ME 'left to rot by the NHS'

A Dorset woman with severe ME who has been unable to leave her bed for eight years has been "left to rot" by the NHS, her family has said. Libby Meyers, 62, is in a nursing home in Charlton Down near Dorchester but her family want her to be treated at a specialist NHS centre in Essex. Her husband and daughter have appealed three times but their applications have been rejected by NHS Dorset. The trust said it was working with the family to address their concerns. ME, which stands for myalgic encephalomyelitis, is also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: 'Surrounded by uncertainty'

When it comes to controversy and heated debate, few illnesses come close to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, also known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME). There have been arguments about whether it exists, the cause, the best treatments and even the name itself. These disagreements have reached the level of . The disease itself, however, remains poorly understood - or as one doctor put it: "The whole thing is surrounded by uncertainty". Does it exist? For a long time, the existence of CFS/ME was widely dismissed and labelled as "yuppie flu". That opinion has largely been reversed in the past decade. Should
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Immune system defect may cause ME

Researchers in Norway believe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), also known as ME, may be caused by a wayward immune system attacking the body. The illness, the cause of which is uncertain and has no known cure, has attracted significant controversy. A small study, , showed a cancer drug, which inhibited the immune system, relieved symptoms in some patients. The ME Association said the findings were "very encouraging news". Doctors in Norway stumbled across their first clue in 2004 when treating a patient with both Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the white blood cells, and CFS. When she received cancer treatment,
Wed 28 Aug 2013

GPs prescribe wood walks in Aberystwyth and Rhondda

GPs are prescribing woodland walks to combat depression and treat heart problems under a new scheme by the Forestry Commission. The Aber Actif Woods project involves woods in Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, and Treherbert in Rhondda Cynon Taf. The commission urged doctors to use its "natural health service" when it highlighted its plans last December. Its officials claimed a woodland walk was a better form of exercise than sending people to the gym. A five-week pilot project was held earlier this year in both areas. The commission, which funds the scheme, said 80 people took part in sessions during the spring and
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Chronic fatigue syndrome 'affects one in 100 pupils'

One in 100 secondary school pupils could be missing classes because of chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), say researchers. A study following 2,855 pupils at three schools, , found 28 missed school with chronic fatigue syndrome. The researchers said the effect was "potentially devastating". A charity said the true figure was likely to be even higher. The cause of chronic fatigue syndrome is unknown and there is no known cure. It is a medical condition rather than just schoolchildren staying up too late. It results in extreme tiredness as well as problems with memory and concentration.
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Journal retracts study linking a virus to ME

A study linking a virus to chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), also known as ME, has been withdrawn by the journal which published it. The 2009 study, , suggested a mouse virus, XMRV, was linked to the illness. But in September this year, the study's authors withdrew some of their findings, saying they were based on "contaminated data". it had "lost confidence" in the study. In a statement, editor-in-chief Bruce Alberts, said the journal had decided to fully retract the paper because of "poor quality control" - and because the findings had not been replicated. It had already published an in
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Review under way into Cornwall's ME service

Cornwall's chronic fatigue syndrome (ME) service is being reviewed. The Royal Cornwall Hospital's Trust said it had temporarily closed referrals for new admissions after the retirement of the head of the service. The Trust also said there was "a national shortage of experts in this field". About 300 people a year in Cornwall are diagnosed with the condition and there are currently about 80 patients waiting to be seen. Cornwall's ME service provides therapy clinics in hospitals across Cornwall, including Stratton, St Austell, Helston and Penzance. Elaine Peller the Chairman of Mesh, an ME Support, Help and Action group in
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Chronic fatigue syndrome: Web therapy 'can help'

Web-based treatment may be better at helping teenagers with chronic fatigue syndrome, according to a study by scientists. Dutch researchers writing in The Lancet journal said 63% of those given psychotherapy online had reported making a recovery. This is almost eight times better than those given standard care. UK experts said the difference was "impressive", and showed that therapy given this way could be effective. The reasons why people suffer chronic fatigue are not well understood, but in recent years it has been suggested that cognitive behavioural therapy - a form of psychotherapy - can have a positive effect in
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Seeking to solve the Lyme disease puzzle

Lyme disease remains a mysterious ailment, even as the ticks that carry the illness continue to spread across the United States. But a new study could help determine why some people get sick. While on a camping trip in Virginia last spring, I was bitten by an Ixodes scapularis, more commonly known as a deer tick. I'm still not sure where the parasite lodged itself, but I think it must have crawled into my hair and fastened on to my scalp. More revolting still, it probably remained there, gorging itself on my blood for at least 36 hours - the
Wed 28 Aug 2013

'It's like being switched off'

Chronic fatigue dominates the lives of people with multiple sclerosis - and other long-term conditions. Here Alison Potts, who has had MS for 20 years, tells how it affects her life. Earlier this month MS in Focus magazine published the results of a global survey on MS fatigue. "My family and friends just think I'm tired and lazy," one person said - and another: "Fatigue prevents me from being the wife and mother I want to be." Chronic fatigue is the most common symptom of MS, the hardest to treat and the most misunderstood. , 89% of the 100,000 people
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Chronic fatigue syndrome: Brain training is most cost-effective treatment

Exercise and behavioural therapies are the most cost-effective and successful ways to treat Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as ME, an analysis shows. A study of 640 patients showed these treatments had the potential to save the economy millions of pounds if they were widely adopted. The findings were published in the journal PLoS ONE. However, another treatment favoured by patients' groups was shown to offer little value. Nobody knows what causes the condition, yet a quarter of a million people in the UK are thought to have it. The symptoms include severe tiredness, poor concentration and memory as well
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Military health expert knighted

A leading researcher into the mental health of military personnel has been knighted in the New Year's Honours. Prof Simon Wessely, said he was "genuinely surprised and incredibly honoured" by the award. He now heads the department of psychological medicine at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College, London. He became interested in "medically unexplained symptoms and syndromes" early in his career, and studied chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - or ME. In 1991 he was involved in setting up one of the first NHS clinics for people with CFS symptoms and in the mid 1990s, he started to investigate Gulf War
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Phil Morgan on the mend after Minch Moor tent gas poisoning

A camper who suffered a brain injury from a leaking gas canister in his unventilated tent has said he is on the road to a full recovery. Phil Morgan, 50, was in a coma for a week after being left unconscious by fumes in the incident in March 2012. He was also suffering from hypothermia when he was found by mountain rescue teams on Minch Moor in the Borders. Mr Morgan, of Stow, said it might take years to fully recover from the carbon monoxide poisoning. His girlfriend Trudy Anderson raised the alarm about the incident last year when she
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Explaining low stamina levels - with spoons

Christine Miserandino came up with the idea in 2003. She has lupus and, when describing her predicament to a close friend in a cafe, grabbed some nearby spoons as props. They counted out 12 spoons and Miserandino explained that daily tasks such as eating breakfast cost her at least one of those spoons, and showering used up two. Who's using spoon theory now? The term snowballed on the internet and since Miserandino blogged about her spoons in 2010, her Facebook page has gained more than 58,000 likes and upwards of 10,000 people have added a supportive Twitter ribbon
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Valley fever: An incurable illness in the dust

Cases of an incurable illness called valley fever are multiplying at a mystifying rate in the American south-west. Six states are affected, and Mexico too, but few places have been hit as hard as one remote city. Even in sweltering heat, the wind brings no respite to Avenal. The gusts are warm, like a hairdryer, and they carry an invisible threat that has claimed and disrupted many lives. The tiny city of 14,000 people, nestling in a dip in the floor of the San Joaquin Valley, California, is what experts refer to as a "hot zone" for coccidioidomycosis - an
Wed 28 Aug 2013

Cancer health issues warning by charity

Hundreds of thousands of people in the UK face poor health or disability after being treated for cancer, says a report from Macmillan Cancer Support. The charity says more should be done to help the one in four affected by long-term problems such as chronic fatigue, pain, sexual and urinary difficulties. These problems can occur when healthy cells are damaged during treatment. Macmillan says patients should be offered continuing support after their treatment for cancer. Although more people are surviving cancer than ever before, thanks to better detection and new treatments, Macmillan says there can be long-term physical and mental
Wed 28 Aug 2013
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